Maybe your nose is a little runny, your throat is feeling a bit tight and scratchy, and you’re starting to feel some body aches, and perhaps even a fever.

Don’t panic. Follow these steps.

Use the Singapore COVID-19 Symptom Checker

The Singapore COVID-19 Symptom Checker (click here) helps guide you on what your next steps should be, based on the symptoms you are experiencing.

Complete a list of questions about your age, recent travel history, people you may have been exposed to and the symptoms you might have. You will then receive immediate suggestions on the next possible steps. 

However, do note that recommendations provided by this checker do not constitute medical advice and you are still advised to see a doctor.

See a doctor

Even if you have mild respiratory symptoms, get it checked out by a doctor.

Go to a Public Health Preparedness Clinic (PHPC) – which provides investigations and subsidised treatment for those with respiratory symptoms.

There are currently more than 900 PHPCs – locate your nearest one at phpc.gov.sg.

Singapore citizens and Permanent Residents with respiratory illnesses pay a subsidised rate of $10 at PHPCs, while Pioneer Generation and Merdeka Generation seniors pay $5.

Subsidies also apply at polyclinics.

If you’re suspected to have pneumonia, you will be referred to a hospital for further tests and care.

Don’t doctor hop.

As of March 10, more than 20 per cent of confirmed COVID-19 cases had visited more than one GP clinic. A number had even visited three or more clinic.

Be socially responsible and return to the same doctor if needed.

This will also help them follow up with your case, and make an appropriate assessment if testing for COVID-19 is needed.

Avoid social gatherings; Don’t go to work/school

Many locally transmitted COVID-19 cases were caused by infected individuals attending social activities despite feeling unwell. MOH announced on 10 March that 22 per cent of cases continued to work and carry on with daily routines even when they were sick.

Don’t go for social gatherings, or attend school or work if you are unwell.

If you are at work and feel unwell, you should leave the workplace immediately and consult a doctor.

The same goes for schools. Temperature-taking is conducted daily and schools are also looking out for other flu-like symptoms, and will suggest to students/staff to see a doctor.

Rest at home until you recover

Even if you have mild symptoms, stay at home and rest.

Doctors have been given guidance to provide medical certificates (MCs) of five days for patients with respiratory symptoms so they can stay home and recover.

Individuals and employers are urged to cooperate and follow strictly the five-day MC regime.

Wear a mask if you’re sick

You should wear a mask if you have a fever, cough or runny nose, or if you are recovering from an illness.

The mask should be worn the proper way – make sure it covers your mouth, nose and chin, with the coloured side facing outwards.

Pinch the metal edge of the mask so that it presses gently on your nose bridge. Remove a used mask by holding only the ear loops.

Monitor your health; practise good personal hygiene

Take your temperature twice daily, and wash your hands regularly with soap and water.

When you cough or sneeze, use a tissue to avoid spreading your illness to others.

Make sure that you dispose of soiled masks and tissues properly in a bin.